Tag Archives: Green Room

Green Room: A Review by Nate Hill 

Green Room has the same vicious, simplistic edge to it that director Jeremy Saulnier’s 2011 thriller Blue Ruin had, but sharpened and honed to near perfection this time around. This is one grim thriller, a claustrophobic little odyssey of desperate violence that’s thick with a sick, overwhelming atmosphere that isn’t for the faint of anything. A big part of what makes it work so well is the fact that it makes sense, in terms of scene to scene actions and character motivations. These aren’t cardboard horror protagonists darting through a predetermined rat maze of a narrative, these are real humans in a deadly situation who act accordingly, with both purpouse and realism. Atmosphere was a huge part of Blue Ruin, and now again Saulnier weaves a tense auditory cloak that puts the characters in the hot seat of danger and the audience in conniptions of suspense. It’s a situation straight out of a seething nightmare: a down and out punk band led by Anton Yelchin are on a dead end tour, severely strapped for cash and getting desperate. When a vague buddy hooks them up with a rural gig, they jump at the chance, until they find out they’re playing for a clubhouse full of angry neo nazi skinheads in a backwoods bar. Everything is going marginally well (as well as coexisting with nazis for a set could go, I suppose) until a member of their group accidentally witnesses one of these freaks brutally slaughter a girl, suddenly branding them all as witnesses. With nowhere to go, the band barricades themselves into the green room and descends into a collective panic as the reality of their situation sets in. Outside, an armada of furious Aryan psychopaths prepares to siege the bar and kill them, led by the clubhouse owner, Darcy (a wicked, malevolent Patrick Stewart, loving every second of a rare villain role). The film clocks in at a scalpel sliced 90 minutes, with not a second wasted on anything that doesn’t propel the story forward with the momentum of a machete ripping through bone. These dudes are out to get them at any cost, and the band in turn are whipped into an adrenaline overdrive of base survival instinct, using anything they can to dispatch their tormentors and escape. Yelchin does an excellent job of making their plight feel uncannily real, the terror emanating from every pore until there’s none left, and empty, deadly resolve sets in. Imogen Poots is great as one of the clubhouse girls, a no nonsense spitfire with revenge on the brain and the will to make it happen. Stewart chomps at the bit with an eerie calm and articulate, insidious presence, a genius casting decision and a joy to see in menacing action. I’m curious to see how much farther Saulnier can push the envelope with his next film, which I’ve heard will be the last entry in this episodic trilogy. This one shows us what a real thriller is, one that pumps your pulse to a boiling point and makes you glad there are filmmakers out there with the balls and creative know-how to make something like this happen. Just bring a thick skin, there’s a ton of graphic and very realistic looking violence. Unbelievably terrific stuff.

PTS Presents Artisan Workbench with RYAN WARREN SMITH

RWS POWERCAST

unnamedPodcasting Them Softly is extremely excited to present our latest Artisan’s Workbench chat with special guest Ryan Warren Smith, who served as production designer on this spring’s indie sensation Green Room! Our love for Green Room is seemingly endless, so it was a special honor to speak with the guy responsible for making that film look and feel so scuzzy and nasty! Some of Ryan‘s other fantastic credits as production designer include the brilliant and heartfelt indie Wendy and Lucy with Michelle Williams, The Motel Life from the Polsky brothers, and the Sundance film For Ellen, wich was directed by So Yong Kim, and stars Paul Dano. Ryan got his start in the industry as an on-set dresser on films like Sean Penn’s Into the Wild, which we’re both massive admirers of, Gus Van Sant’s Restless, the intense drama The Burning Plain, and he served as property master on the phenomenal if underseen western Meek’s Cutoff. We also get a chance to hear about his upcoming projects which sound very exciting. We hope you enjoy this terrific conversation!

PTS Presents Cinematographer’s Corner with SEAN PORTER

porter powercast

 

sean_porterPodcasting Them Softly is thrilled to present a chat with cinematographer Sean Porter, who recently shot the film KUMIKO, THE TREASURE HUNTER, and who has the highly anticipated thriller GREEN ROOM set for release later this year from A24. He’s also finished a pair of very intriguing projects with THE TRUST, which stars Nicolas Cage, Jerry Lewis and Elijah Wood, and 20TH CENTURY WOMEN, from director Mike Mills, and starring Elle Fanning, Alia Shawkat, Greta Gerwig, and Annette Benning. Sean got his start working on a variety of shorts, features, and documentaries, and has roots firmly planted in indie film community, and you can just tell from observing his work that he’s a talent to seriously look out for in the near future. His work on KUMIKO was beyond striking, announching an exciting and dynamic new visual eye to emerge on the cinematic scene, and it’s a film that we here at PTS are massive fans of and hope everyone will get a chance to check out. We hope you enjoy this most excellent discussion!