Tag Archives: Ryan Phillippe

The Lincoln Lawyer

The Lincoln Lawyer was the first film in the revival of Matthew McConaughey’s career after a lengthy slump stretching back to the early 2000’s, and what a banger of a pseudo courtroom drama it turned out to be. Based on the series of novels by Michael Connelly which focus on slick, morally untethered defence attorney Mick Haller (played to perfection by Matt), director Brad Furman whips up an enjoyable, razor sharp yet laid back LA crime saga that’s smart, re-watchable and competently staged, not to mention stuffed to the roof with great actors. Haller is something of a renegade lawyer who operates smoothly from the leather interior of his Lincoln town car, driven by trusty chauffeur Earl (the always awesome Lawrence Mason). Mick is ice cool and seldom bothered by the legal atrocities he commits, until one case follows him home and digs up a tormented conscience he never knew he had. Hired to defend a rich brat (Ryan Phillipe) accused of murdering a call girl, events take a turn for the unpredictable as older crimes are dug up, double crosses are laid bare and everyone’s life starts to unravel. It’s a deliciously constructed story with twists and payoffs galore, as well as one hell of an arc for McConaughey to flesh out in the kind of desperate, lone wolf role that mirrors the dark side of his idealistic lawyer in Joel Schumacher’s A Time To Kill. Let’s talk supporting cast: Marisa Tomei is sexy and easygoing as Mick’s ex wife and rival, Bryan Cranston simmers on low burn as a nasty detective, William H. Macy does a lively turn as his PI buddy, plus excellent work from Frances Fisher, Shea Wigham, John Leguizamo, Bob Gunton, Bob Gunton, Pell James, Katherine Moennig and the great Michael Paré as a resentful cop who proves to be quite useful later on. There’s a dark side to the story too that I appreciated, in the fact that not every wrong is righted, or at least fully, a sad fact that can be seen in an unfortunate character played by Michael Pena, but indicative of life’s brutal realities, something Hollywood sometimes tries to smother. One of the great courtroom films out there, a gem in McConaughey’s career and just a damn fine time at the movies.

-Nate Hill

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PTS Presents Editor’s Suite with DAVID KITTREDGE

Kittredge POWERCAST

unnamedPodcasting Them Softly is extremely excited to present a discussion with special guest David Kittredge, the editor of 54: The Director’s Cut, which can be streamed via Amazon and iTunes and is now available to own on Blu-ray. Back in 1997, Mark Christopher’s disco club odyssey was released in theaters in a compromised state, featuring edits and reshoots not ever planned by the filmmakers, and which changed the general shape and scope of the picture. Now, nearly 20 years later, the creative team was able to go back to the original footage which test screening audiences balked at, and have reformed the movie as the ultimate director’s cut. There are so few films that experience a life like this one, as it’s a movie that got hit hard by critics and ignored by theatrical audiences at the time of its release. But because of our constantly shifting social attitudes and the advent of the DVD cult classic, it’s now time for this vibrant, sexy, and totally entertaining film to see the light of day as fully intended. A graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and creative director of LA-based Triple Fire Productions, David is also the writer/director of film festival favorite Pornography: A Thriller, and has worked on various short films in multiple capacities. We also riff for a bit on one of our mutually favorite filmmakers, the late, great Tony Scott, which is always an exciting way to spend an evening. We hope you enjoy this fascinating, truly inside-Hollywood discussion about a film that deserves to find a new following!