Tag Archives: Phone Booth

Joel Schumacher’s Phone Booth 


“Isn’t it funny? You hear a phone ring and it could be anybody. But a ringing phone has to be answered, doesn’t it? Doesn’t it?”

So snarls Kiefer Sutherland’s mysterious telephone terrorist to a petrified Colin Farrell in Joel Schumacher’s Phone Booth,

a taut, entertaining and oh so slightly heavy handed single location thriller that brings home the bacon, albeit messily spilling some grease along the way. Farrell is a hotshot businessman who steps into a phone booth (remember those?) one day, which serendipitously happens to also be the favourite haunt for sniper slinging whackjob Sutherland, who plays sadistic mind games, extorts the poor guy and digs up his darkest secrets, all while keeping him firmly in the crosshairs of his high powered rifle. The cops, led by a stoic Forest Whitaker, are perplexed at first and eventually drawn into this monster’s web too, as Farrell’s life begins to unravel at the whims of this unseen harasser, and the audience gets to see just how far either will go to resolve or escalate the situation. In this day and age there’d never be a scenario like this, the obvious reason being the extinction of phone-booths, but in the era of social media tech giants there’s just too much information and reaction time available for a situation this intimate to play out to the end. These days this nightmare would take the form of account hacking, an equally terrifying prospect, but a far less lucrative idea for a film. Now, we never really see Sutherland but for a few bleary frames, and he probably just recorded his dialogue from a cushy studio in jammies plastered with the 24 logo, but none of that takes away any of the lupine, icy calm malevolence from his vocal work here, and we believe in the ability of this man to freeze someone in their tracks, not only with a gun but with the power of verbal intonation as well. Farrell uses atypical caged animal intensity to ramp up the tension, and the other players, including Rhada Mitchell as his wife, Jared Leto and a very young looking Katie Holmes do fine by their roles. It’s a little glossy, a little too Hollywood if you know what I mean, but it’s a well oiled thriller nonetheless, with Sutherland’s shrouded, edgy persona being the highlight. 

-Nate Hill

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PTS Presents Actor’s Spotlight with JOSH PAIS

PAIS POWERCAST

 

P2190032-LPodcasting Them Softly is honored to present a chat with actor Josh Pais! Josh is one of those great performers who has quietly amassed an insanely rich body of work, and if you don’t immediately recognize his name, you more than likely know his face from something you’ve seen, or 10 things that you’ve seen, as he punctuates everything he appears in with humor and intelligence and a great sense of craft. Some of his fabulous big screen credits include Synechdoche, NY, Adventureland, Year of the Dog, Teeth, Rounders, A Beautiful Mind, Phone Booth, A Civil Action, Scream 3, Arbitrage, the wildly underrated dark comedy Leaves of Grass, the excellent social comedy Please Give, and of course, one of his most memorable big screen performances came in Lynn Shelton’s Touchy Feely, who of course is one of the original friends of Podcasting Them Softly. Josh‘s work in TV is beyond reproach, having made appearances on Ray Donovan, Law and Order SVU, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, The Good Wife, Sex and the City, Rescue Me, and dozens more. Upcoming projects include the remake of the classic Martin Brest comedy Going in Style, the Hank Williams musical biopic I Saw the Light, and a new film from Jason Bateman called The Family Fang. Josh is also the founder and director of Committed Impulse, high performance training for actors, artists, and entrepreneurs.  We hope you enjoy this informative and extremely entertaining discussion!